Painted sketch with water soluble graphite and a white watercolor pencil on toned paper. Thinking about doing commissions of these now that I have a nice reliable scanner.
View on Weasyl
high resolution →

Painted sketch with water soluble graphite and a white watercolor pencil on toned paper. Thinking about doing commissions of these now that I have a nice reliable scanner.

View on Weasyl

ripvontinkle:

jeanox:

painted-bees:

artist-confessions:

Really low prices make me less likely to commission an artist.Me: I’m not an artist. I do commission artists - I spend around $300-600 a month on digital art commissions.I sometimes find an artist who has really impressive work, or a unique style, or something else that makes me think “I should commission this person.”. Then I look at their prices and they are crazily low. As in less than 20 dollars for a colour full body character.And I don’t commission them. Because I can’t pay prices that low and feel good about myself for doing it.I know it takes hours to draw even one character. Plus the time it takes to study the brief, look at the references, communicate with me, etc etc. No way are they making even minimum wage this way, let alone a living wage.I commission art because it’s fun. It’s my hobby. If I’m knowingly paying someone slave wages to support my hobby, it isn’t fun.To artists who undercharge: Please reconsider. I’ve heard many reasons why you decide to do this (see below). But if you price your work like you don’t respect it, you won’t get clients who will respect you or your work either. You charge peanuts, you get monkeys.To commissioners who push for these prices: Have some respect. Not just for the artists, but for the other commissioners out there. You’re giving us all a bad name. If you can’t afford decent prices, don’t be mean about it. Save up, or find some other hobby. Or hey, learn to draw.
Comments I get whenever I say the above: 
"No-one will buy commissions from me at decent prices." - That’s a pity. But you realise by underpricing like this you are making your problem worse, by contributing to the “art should be dirt cheap” mindset that seems to exist in dA and other places? (okay mostly dA, that place is a cesspit) Besides, there are other things you can do than keep lowering prices. There’s tons of advice in dA:'Official' Pricing Your Commissions or Artwork ThreadFinding Freelance work: pricing and self doubt!And other places:How to get commissions: A guideGetting the Most Out of CommissionsIf none of the above helps you… maybe you need to reconsider if you are at the right stage in your development to be offering commissions. Sorry.
"I’m only doing this for fun, I don’t care about the money." - Good for you. But there are others that are trying to make a living doing this. Have some consideration for them, yes?
"It’s the clients pushing my prices down." - Gah. Then your clients are awful people who don’t respect you. It’s a trap though - you charge low prices, you get cheap clients. There’s only one way out of that trap.
(Commissioner says) “But I want this drawn and I can’t afford higher prices.” - I want to live in an exact replica of Wayne Manor, but I can’t afford that. So, um, I don’t. Simplify your idea, or don’t commission it until you can afford to do so without ripping off the artist.
(Commissioner says) “By paying less per artist I can support more artists.” - No. Just… no. You are not supporting artists, you are exploiting them. Paying less per artists lets you exploit more artists.
"Just tip the artist." - I have done that, but it sends the wrong message. Tipping isn’t the norm in this game, so when I tip artists assume it’s because they did an extra-awesome job, when in fact I’m tipping them because they did their normal-awesome job. Plus if an artist is charging one-third or one-quarter what they should be, do I tip them 300%?
(Image by me. Not an artist, remember? The price list is made up, but based on real lists I’ve seen recently.)
submitted by -badgermushroom

wow this is actually one of the best things to ever come out of artist’s confessions. 

“To artists who undercharge: Please reconsider. I’ve heard many reasons why you decide to do this (see below). But if you price your work like you don’t respect it, you won’t get clients who will respect you or your work either. You charge peanuts, you get monkeys.”
This is so true. The most hellish clients I’ve had in illustration and graphic design have all come from undercharging. It’s like the cheaper the prices you charge, the more entitled the clients tend to become. It doesn’t make sense to me, but that’s been my experience for the last few years. 
Also being able to eat is nice. Charge appropriately, guys. 

Thank fuck for OP. I’ve been wanting to do a rant about this because I’ve seen a few artist friends lowball their prices. It’s really frustrating and rather selfish to do that because YOU are forcing prices to go down and hurting other artists who make a living off commissions.
I keep hearing the excuse of “well, I don’t feel good enough to have prices that high” and that just shows you have no respect for your art. You are better off just not doing commissions if that’s how you think. 
You should at least charge based on minimum wage in your area (as an example 7.50 in mine). If a sketch takes an hour then it should be exactly 7.50 (or thereabouts). Sketch plus line-art in two hours? About 15. Adding color? 20-25. And so forth. 
So, stop with your excuses, raise your prices, and people will less likely take advantage of you because you have respect for your art and will be taken more seriously. 

ripvontinkle:

jeanox:

painted-bees:

artist-confessions:

Really low prices make me less likely to commission an artist.

Me: I’m not an artist. I do commission artists - I spend around $300-600 a month on digital art commissions.

I sometimes find an artist who has really impressive work, or a unique style, or something else that makes me think “I should commission this person.”. Then I look at their prices and they are crazily low. As in less than 20 dollars for a colour full body character.

And I don’t commission them. Because I can’t pay prices that low and feel good about myself for doing it.

I know it takes hours to draw even one character. Plus the time it takes to study the brief, look at the references, communicate with me, etc etc. No way are they making even minimum wage this way, let alone a living wage.

I commission art because it’s fun. It’s my hobby. If I’m knowingly paying someone slave wages to support my hobby, it isn’t fun.

To artists who undercharge: Please reconsider. I’ve heard many reasons why you decide to do this (see below). But if you price your work like you don’t respect it, you won’t get clients who will respect you or your work either. You charge peanuts, you get monkeys.

To commissioners who push for these prices: Have some respect. Not just for the artists, but for the other commissioners out there. You’re giving us all a bad name. If you can’t afford decent prices, don’t be mean about it. Save up, or find some other hobby. Or hey, learn to draw.


Comments I get whenever I say the above:

  • "No-one will buy commissions from me at decent prices." - That’s a pity. But you realise by underpricing like this you are making your problem worse, by contributing to the “art should be dirt cheap” mindset that seems to exist in dA and other places? (okay mostly dA, that place is a cesspit) Besides, there are other things you can do than keep lowering prices. There’s tons of advice in dA:
    'Official' Pricing Your Commissions or Artwork Thread
    Finding Freelance work: pricing and self doubt!

    And other places:
    How to get commissions: A guide
    Getting the Most Out of Commissions
    If none of the above helps you… maybe you need to reconsider if you are at the right stage in your development to be offering commissions. Sorry.
  • "I’m only doing this for fun, I don’t care about the money." - Good for you. But there are others that are trying to make a living doing this. Have some consideration for them, yes?
  • "It’s the clients pushing my prices down." - Gah. Then your clients are awful people who don’t respect you. It’s a trap though - you charge low prices, you get cheap clients. There’s only one way out of that trap.
  • (Commissioner says) “But I want this drawn and I can’t afford higher prices.” - I want to live in an exact replica of Wayne Manor, but I can’t afford that. So, um, I don’t. Simplify your idea, or don’t commission it until you can afford to do so without ripping off the artist.
  • (Commissioner says) “By paying less per artist I can support more artists.” - No. Just… no. You are not supporting artists, you are exploiting them. Paying less per artists lets you exploit more artists.
  • "Just tip the artist." - I have done that, but it sends the wrong message. Tipping isn’t the norm in this game, so when I tip artists assume it’s because they did an extra-awesome job, when in fact I’m tipping them because they did their normal-awesome job. Plus if an artist is charging one-third or one-quarter what they should be, do I tip them 300%?

(Image by me. Not an artist, remember? The price list is made up, but based on real lists I’ve seen recently.)

submitted by -badgermushroom

wow this is actually one of the best things to ever come out of artist’s confessions. 

To artists who undercharge: Please reconsider. I’ve heard many reasons why you decide to do this (see below). But if you price your work like you don’t respect it, you won’t get clients who will respect you or your work either. You charge peanuts, you get monkeys.”

This is so true. The most hellish clients I’ve had in illustration and graphic design have all come from undercharging. It’s like the cheaper the prices you charge, the more entitled the clients tend to become. It doesn’t make sense to me, but that’s been my experience for the last few years. 

Also being able to eat is nice. Charge appropriately, guys. 

Thank fuck for OP. I’ve been wanting to do a rant about this because I’ve seen a few artist friends lowball their prices. It’s really frustrating and rather selfish to do that because YOU are forcing prices to go down and hurting other artists who make a living off commissions.

I keep hearing the excuse of “well, I don’t feel good enough to have prices that high” and that just shows you have no respect for your art. You are better off just not doing commissions if that’s how you think. 

You should at least charge based on minimum wage in your area (as an example 7.50 in mine). If a sketch takes an hour then it should be exactly 7.50 (or thereabouts). Sketch plus line-art in two hours? About 15. Adding color? 20-25. And so forth. 

So, stop with your excuses, raise your prices, and people will less likely take advantage of you because you have respect for your art and will be taken more seriously. 

fox-orian:

kid-fantastic:

beatonna:

Aaaaaa this twitter is horrifying aaaaaaa
To all you young artists out there: this sort of thing is likely to come your way at some point!  Don’t be fooled, rare - RARE - is the job where the “exposure” is worth a lack of/very little pay.

o_o
I don’t know whether to laugh or put my foot through a wall. 

This is too good. I take a firm stance on not doing work for free. I get countless “offers” for unpaid gigs through email and DA all the time. I never respond to them. I have to pay rent, student loans, eat, you know things that require making money in order to maintain.
Does this ever happen the other way around?Just curious, have programmers ever gotten emails from artists saying “Hey I have this idea for a game but I can’t program. I’m also poor. But hey it’s exposure!” or an artist to a writer, “I want to draw a comic but I can’t write! Come up with a script! I can’t pay you now, but just think of the exposure!” Though programmers and writers certainly get asked to do gigs for free, too, artists get slammed the worst on this stuff. I hope that puts it a little in perspective for people.
The classic example still stands the best though: If your car needs to be repaired by a mechanic, would you ask them to do the job for free in exchange for exposure? “Just think of how many people will see the great job you guys did as I drive around!” No. Of course you wouldn’t ask that. That’s stupid and unrealistic.
Oh also: CONTESTS ARE INCLUDED IN THIS. DON’T DO CONTESTS. THEY’RE JUST FREE WORK OFFERS UNDER DISGUISE.
high resolution →

fox-orian:

kid-fantastic:

beatonna:

Aaaaaa this twitter is horrifying aaaaaaa

To all you young artists out there: this sort of thing is likely to come your way at some point!  Don’t be fooled, rare - RARE - is the job where the “exposure” is worth a lack of/very little pay.

o_o

I don’t know whether to laugh or put my foot through a wall. 

This is too good. I take a firm stance on not doing work for free. I get countless “offers” for unpaid gigs through email and DA all the time. I never respond to them. I have to pay rent, student loans, eat, you know things that require making money in order to maintain.

Does this ever happen the other way around?
Just curious, have programmers ever gotten emails from artists saying “Hey I have this idea for a game but I can’t program. I’m also poor. But hey it’s exposure!” or an artist to a writer, “I want to draw a comic but I can’t write! Come up with a script! I can’t pay you now, but just think of the exposure!” Though programmers and writers certainly get asked to do gigs for free, too, artists get slammed the worst on this stuff. I hope that puts it a little in perspective for people.

The classic example still stands the best though: If your car needs to be repaired by a mechanic, would you ask them to do the job for free in exchange for exposure? “Just think of how many people will see the great job you guys did as I drive around!” No. Of course you wouldn’t ask that. That’s stupid and unrealistic.

Oh also: CONTESTS ARE INCLUDED IN THIS. DON’T DO CONTESTS. THEY’RE JUST FREE WORK OFFERS UNDER DISGUISE.

1 year ago · 5,169 notes · Reblog
#art 
I watercolor sketched a thing
high resolution →

I watercolor sketched a thing

latimes:

lacma:

Two years ago, we launched an experiment: an online image library where we made 2,000 high-resolution images of artworks that the museum deemed to be in the public domain available for download without any restrictions.  This week, we’ve exceeded ourselves with the launch of our new collections website, giving away ten times the number of images we offered in the initial image library. Nearly 20,000 high-quality images of art from our collection are available to search, download, and use as you see fit.
What Do Cats Have to Do With It? Welcome to Our New Collections Website
Dear Tumblr-verse,
Merry Christmas: we just gave you 20,000 high-resolution images, for free. Now we have just one question: what are you going to do with them?

It’s a public domain buffet!

latimes:

lacma:

Two years ago, we launched an experiment: an online image library where we made 2,000 high-resolution images of artworks that the museum deemed to be in the public domain available for download without any restrictions.  This week, we’ve exceeded ourselves with the launch of our new collections website, giving away ten times the number of images we offered in the initial image library. Nearly 20,000 high-quality images of art from our collection are available to search, download, and use as you see fit.

What Do Cats Have to Do With It? Welcome to Our New Collections Website

Dear Tumblr-verse,

Merry Christmas: we just gave you 20,000 high-resolution images, for free. Now we have just one question: what are you going to do with them?

It’s a public domain buffet!

1 year ago · 6,005 notes · Reblog
#art #reference 
Redraw of an 11 year old picture.  I tried to do it in that faux copic style but I dunno.
high resolution →

Redraw of an 11 year old picture.  I tried to do it in that faux copic style but I dunno.

barleytea:

happy new year’s eve 8)
high resolution →

barleytea:

happy new year’s eve 8)

sheppymomma:

“Warrior of the Rice Paddy” - 2012
Tribute to a fallen companion. I will miss you Genghis.
watercolor & acrylic
high resolution →

sheppymomma:

“Warrior of the Rice Paddy” - 2012

Tribute to a fallen companion. I will miss you Genghis.

watercolor & acrylic

Watching Doctor Who and sketching during the commercials :V (Taken with Instagram)
high resolution →

Watching Doctor Who and sketching during the commercials :V (Taken with Instagram)

TimeChaser recommendation time~

If you’re considering doing any work or experimentation with watercolors, get one of these:

And make sure it’s from Niji.  Don’t get a cheaper one, it’s not even worth it.

I only have a medium right now, but I want more.  Especially paired with the water soluble pencils I use it makes for a lot of wonderful experimental sketches <3